Dreamforce 2012 Video: George Zimmer – CEO of Men’s Wareharehouse

I loved hearing George Zimmer – CEO of Men’s Warehouse talk about the importance of Reaching Millennials with Social Media.

Founded in 1973, Men’s Wearhouse is one of North America’s largest specialty retailers of men’s apparel with 1,239 stores. The Men’s Wearhouse, Moores and K&G stores carry a full selection of designer, brand name and private label suits, sport coats, furnishings and accessories and Men’s Wearhouse and Tux stores carry a limited selection. Tuxedo rentals are available in the Men’s Wearhouse, Moores and Men’s Wearhouse and Tux stores. Additionally, Men’s Wearhouse operates a global corporate apparel and workwear group consisting of TwinHill in the United States and Dimensions, Alexandra and Yaffy in the United Kingdom.

Dreamforce, a cloud computing event is also a socially connected enterprise event. Part of the reason for attending a conference like Dreamforce is that it’s a conference where you can learn – from industry leaders who are paving the way—about how the social revolution is changing the way we do business.

To learn more about Dreamforce 2012, click here.

Learn. Share. Grow!
@DrNatalie L. Petouhoff

For more info on my work:
Ebook
:Social Media ROI

Social Media ROI YouTube Videos:
Video 1: Building the Business Case for Social Media
Video 2: How to Measure the ROI of Social Media

Video 3: How Social Media Benefits the Whole Company

Book on Monetizing Facebook: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans

Let’s Connect here:
Twitter:
 @drnatalie
LinkedIn: DrNataliePetouhoff
G+ : Google Plus posts

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Dreamforce 2012 Video: Commonwealth Bank of Australia

Andy Lark, CMO Commonwealth Bank of Australia, talks about the new meaning of being customer-centric using social media.

The Commonwealth Bank is Australia’s leading provider of integrated financial services including retail banking, premium banking, business banking, institutional banking, funds management, superannuation, insurance, investment and sharebroking products and services. The Group is one of the largest listed companies on the Australian Securities Exchange and is included in the Morgan Stanley Capital Global Index.

Dreamforce, a cloud computing event is also a socially connected enterprise event. Part of the reason for attending a conference like Dreamforce is that it’s a conference where you can learn – from industry leaders who are paving the way—about how the social revolution is changing the way we do business.

To learn more about Dreamforce 2012, click here.

 

Learn. Share. Grow!
@DrNatalie L. Petouhoff

For more info on my work:
Ebook
:Social Media ROI

Social Media ROI YouTube Videos:
Video 1: Building the Business Case for Social Media
Video 2: How to Measure the ROI of Social Media

Video 3: How Social Media Benefits the Whole Company

Book on Monetizing Facebook: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans

Let’s Connect here:
Twitter:
 @drnatalie
LinkedIn: DrNataliePetouhoff
G+ : Google Plus posts

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Dreamforce Video 2012: Marc Benioff & Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts

Marc Benioff talks to the CEO of Burberry, Angela Ahrendts, about how new technology is making Burberry a better company.

Burberry Group plc is a British luxury fashion house, distributing clothing and fashion accessories and licensing fragrances that was founded in 1856 by travelers when 21-year-old Thomas Burberry. Its distinctive tartan pattern has become one of its most widely copied trademarks. Burberry is most famous for its iconic trench coat, which was invented by founder Thomas Burberry. The company has branded stores and franchises around the world, and also sells through concessions in third-party stores. HM Queen Elizabeth II and HRH The Prince of Wales have granted the company Royal Warrants.

Dreamforce, a cloud computing event is also a socially connected enterprise event. Part of the reason for attending a conference like Dreamforce is that it’s a conference where you can learn – from industry leaders who are paving the way—about how the social revolution is changing the way we do business.

“You have to be totally connected with everyone who touches your brand,” Ahrendts remarked. The iconic fashion brand embraces social media to not only engage with their customers but to grow the company new ways.

To learn more about Burberry, click here.

To learn more about Dreamforce 2012, click here.

 

Learn. Share. Grow!
@DrNatalie L. Petouhoff

For more info on my work:
Ebook
:Social Media ROI

Social Media ROI YouTube Videos:
Video 1: Building the Business Case for Social Media
Video 2: How to Measure the ROI of Social Media

Video 3: How Social Media Benefits the Whole Company

Book on Monetizing Facebook: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans

Let’s Connect here:
Twitter:
@drnatalie
LinkedIn: DrNataliePetouhoff
G+ : Google Plus posts

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The Bottomline on The ROI of Social Media

One of my favorite topics is talking about how social media is really changing business. Having looked at this topic for a number of years now I still surprised that more people aren’t familiar with building the business case for social media. Regardless of what role I have had, I continue to see the same patterns. Customers not happy with a company’s products and/or services are using social channels to broadcast their frustration, and often disdain, to millions. And there are still some companies that are unsure whether social media is really here to stay and even hesitating to really dig in deep to social media. That really blows my mind!

Many companies have done the basics… get a Twitter handle and tweet or have a Facebook page… But what really sets a company apart is the understanding that just doing the basics in social media is only the tip of the iceberg. Many of you who have seen me speak on this topic know my point of view on social media. It’s not just a channel or a technology. It’s probably one of the most important contributions to business since the assembly line.

The reason? It is literally transforming business. That may sound a bit dramatic, but my point of view on this comes from my days of listening to my dad speak about working in the auto industry. He would tell me stories about a man named Edward Deming. Deming’s moto was essentially to listen to your customers and your employees. Take that feedback and integrate it back into your company. If you were successful in doing that and really making the changes that needed to be made on an ongoing basis, you’d have a very successful company.

What I’ve found most striking about social media is that — if used as an enterprise feedback tool — it is the best source of data… from both customer’s and employee’s that a company could ever dream of obtaining. And what we are seeing is that companies that realize how to use social media – across all departments — PR, Marketing, Customer Service, Product Development, Sales, Manufacturing, etc… are the ones that are truly getting huge return’s on their investment.

I’ll be doing a series of posts on this topic and go into more detail on some of my philosophies on social media and how its transforming business. But for now, I’ll share with you some links to some of the content we’ve recently created. You may have seen Kathy Herrmann and I speak on the topic of social media ROI. To help people get a better handle on this topic, we put our thought leadership together, along with Salesforce.com to produce a white paper and several videos.

Below are the links to the materials we’ve created. We hope that these help people:

  • Believe that the ROI of social media can be calculated
  • Gain a better understanding of how ROI can be calculated
  • Use this information to start to create their own business cases and
  • Stimulate a lot of discussion on the topic.

We believe that in the course of dialogue on topics like this, some of the myths will be shattered, people will begin to help each other to get a clearer understanding of the impact social media can have on their business and together we can transform not only business, but education, government and many many other things that are very important to us all! And this is ONLY the beginning!!!

I hope that these materials help you and look forward to talking with you more. We’ll be hosting several Twitter Chats on the topics in the next few weeks, so be on the look out for when and what time!

Cheers and many, many, many happy returns!

@drnatalie  Learn. Share. Grow!

Videos:
Snackable Insights Into ROI of Social Media
Episode 1: How to Build a Business Case for Social Customer Service
Episode 2: Calculating ROI for Social Customer Service
Episode 3: How Social Customer Service Benefits the Entire Company
White Paper: ROI Guide

Info on: Social Customer Service

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An Interview with Tony Nemelka On The Future of Business as They Deploy Social Media and Enterprise 2.0 Technologies

In this interview, I spoke to Tony about his thoughts on where we are and the future of Social CRM.

Tony Nemelka, Social CRM Expert

Tony Nemelka, Social CRM Expert

Tony started his career at IBM in mainframe sales, then went to watch the PC, client server revolution.

And today he is seeing a new kind of revolution:

  • First is the transformation of business to a more social business where customers and employees are thought of as “partners.”  This change in strategy and its accompanying technologies results in changes in business processes introduced by the internet.
  • And second is revolution is around the “cloud” or others might refer to it as SaaS.

He sees companies looking to deploy things that are going to offer them competitive advantages. And the questions they will be asking themselves are:

  • “Where is the innovation going to come from?”
  • “Where is it going to be built? On premise or in the “cloud?” and
  • “What tools/ applications will can we use?”

He talked about his experience with the VC (venture capital) world. He does not seem them focusing on funding on-premise technologies or applications. Which sounds like the innovations will be centered around the “cloud.”

Click here to hear how Tony sees the future shaping up:

You can follow Tony on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/tnemelka

p.s. Tony’s lanyard was via http://www.zebra.com/

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To participate in more conversations on Social CRM, follow me on twitter: drnatalie and use the Twitter hash tags: #SCRM #CustomerService #VSCRM #SocialMedia

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Exclusive Interview with Esteban Kolsky on Social CRM Analytics

In this interview with Esteban, we look the necessity of analytics on social CRM. Pretty much you get what you measure.

Esteban Kolsky, Social CRM Expert

Esteban Kolsky, Social CRM Expert

Esteban told me that his opinion on whether companies will truly become “social” depends upon their ability to collect, analyze and implement social feedback- from both employees and customers.

Most of the feedback in the social cloud is unstructured. So then the question becomes how does a company make sense of this unstructured data cloud?

Esteban gives his thoughts on:

  • Enterprise feedback management – the old way and the new way- via social CRM
  • The need for real-time responses to customer social interactions
  • The differences between monitoring customer feedback interactions and creating actionable insight: sentiment, cost, the affect and the next steps of the company based based on the feedback and comments in the cloud
  • The voice of the customer, customer experience and executive oversight of integrating these into business
  • The business value of adding social customer interaction feedback to your company.

Click to hear Esteban’s thoughts on measuring the value of Social CRM: (the video is ~6 minutes long- so it takes a minute to load… but be patient… its worth the wait…)


Esteban Kolsky on Measuring the Value of Social CRM

You can follow Esteban on twitter: he is at http://www.twitter.com/ekolsky

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To participate in more conversations on Social CRM, follow me on twitter: drnatalie and use the Twitter hash tags: #SCRM #CustomerService #VSCRM #SocialMedia

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How Los Angeles Radio Station, KCRW is Using Social Media to Interact and Serve Listeners

Anil Dewan, Director of New Media, KCRW

Anil Dewan, Director of New Media, KCRW

While at the 140tc  Conference in Los Angeles, I had the honor to interview KCRW’s Anil Dewan, Director of New Media and learn how they are using social media to attract fans,  interact with them and serve them better!

You can follow him on Twitter at @AnilDewan and you can follow KCRW on Twitter @KCRW.

Here’s the interview with Anil…

Here’s a snapshot of KCRW’s website page on “how to interact with us using social media sites like Twitter, MySpace and Facebook.”

KRCW's social networking website page

KRCW's social networking website page

This gives those that are not familiar with social media clear information on how to become a social interaction fan of KCRW.

How to Connect With KCRW's Facebook Page

How to Connect With KCRW on Facebook

KCRW's instructions on how to connect with them on MySpace

KCRW's instructions on how to connect with them on MySpace

KCRW's Twitter Page

KCRW's Twitter Page

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Customer Service? Ask a Volunteer

HERE’S the job description: You spend a few hours a day, up to 20 a week, at your computer, supplying answers online to customer questions about technical matters like how to set up an Internet home network or how to program a new high-definition television.

The pay: $0.

A shabby form of exploitation? Not to Justin McMurry of Keller, Tex., who spends about that amount of time helping customers of Verizon’s high-speed fiber optic Internet, television and telephone service, which the company is gradually rolling out across the country.

Mr. McMurry is part of an emerging corps of Web-savvy helpers that large corporations, start-up companies and venture capitalists are betting will transform the field of customer service.

Such enthusiasts are known as lead users, or super-users, and their role in contributing innovations to product development and improvement — often selflessly — has been closely researched in recent years. There have been case studies of early skateboarders and mountain bikers and their pioneering tweaks to their gear, for example, and of the programmers who were behind open-source software like the Linux operating system. These unpaid contributors, it seems, are motivated mainly by a payoff in enjoyment and respect among their peers.

But can this same kind of economy of social rewards develop in the realm of customer service? It is, after all, a field that companies typically regard as a costly nuisance and that consumers often view as a source of frustration.

A look at the evolving experiment that Verizon Communications began in July suggests that company-sponsored online communities for customer service, if handled adeptly, hold considerable promise.

Mark Studness, director of e-commerce at Verizon, is a software engineer by training and an avid consumer electronics tinkerer whose home projects have included installing high-end audiovisual systems. In those projects, he has often visited Web sites where users offer one another tips and answer questions. Verizon, Mr. Studness determined, needed to find a smart way to try to tap into that potential resource for customer service.

In talking to people and surveying the research on voluntary online communities, Verizon concluded that super-users would be crucial to success.

“You have to make an environment that attracts the Justin McMurrys of the world, because that’s where the magic happens,” Mr. Studness said.

Natalie L. Petouhoff, an analyst at Forrester Research, said that online user groups conform to what she calls the 1-9-90 rule. About 1 percent of those in the community, she explained, are super-users who supply most of the best answers and commentary. An additional 9 percent are “responders” who mainly reply and rate Web posts, she said, and the other 90 percent are “readers” who primarily peruse and search the Web site for useful information.

“The 90 percent will come,” Ms. Petouhoff said, “if you have the 1 percent.”

Verizon explored the alternative of building the Web site and managing the forums itself, but it decided to call on outside expertise. Several suppliers, including HelpStream, Jive Software and Telligent, offer corporate social networking software with customer service features. Verizon chose Lithium Technologies, a fast-growing start-up based in Emeryville, Calif.

Lithium comes to online customer service from a heritage in gaming. Its chief executive and co-founder, Lyle Fong, was a founder of GX Media, which developed a leading Web site, Gamers.com, and created technologies for professional rankings and tournaments.

Lithium’s current roster of 125 clients includes AT&T, BT, iRobot, Linksys, Best Buy and Nintendo.

The mentality of super-users in online customer-service communities is similar to that of devout gamers, according to Mr. Fong. Lithium’s customer service sites for companies, for example, offer elaborate rating systems for contributors, with ranks, badges and “kudos counts.”

“That alone is addictive,” Mr. Fong said. “They are revered by their peers.”

Benchmark Capital, a venture capital firm that invested $12 million in Lithium last year, was impressed with the company’s gaming background and its focus on catering to super-users to build communities. Peter Fenton, a Benchmark general partner, said that many of the most popular consumer Web sites and services, from Wikipedia to Twitter, are animated by a relatively small percentage of avid users.

“In customer service, it’s still very early, but I think it’s likely the same pattern will play out,” said Mr. Fenton, who serves on the boards of both Twitter and Yelp, a site where users post reviews of restaurants and other local businesses.

At Verizon, Mr. Studness says he is pleased with the experiment so far. He calls the company-sponsored customer-service site “a very productive tool,” partly because it absorbs many thousands of questions that would otherwise be expensive calls to a Verizon call center.

But the online forums, he added, also provide customer ideas for improvements in hardware and software for the company’s fiber optic service, as well as a large, growing and searchable knowledge base online.

“One answer can help thousands,” he said.

Mr. McMurry, who is 68 and a retired software engineer, is supplying answers by the bushel. He joined the Verizon-sponsored forums in August after reading about them on another technical Web site. A scan through his lengthy list of posts shows a range from the straightforward (programming a DVR remotely by computer) to the arcane (the fine points of HDMI technology, for High-Definition Multimedia Interface).

As a software expert, Mr. McMurry has taught training classes. “Seeing the light turn on in their eyes when they understood was exciting,” he said.

His online tutoring, he observed, brings a similar satisfaction.

“People seem to like most of what I say online, and I like doing it,” he said.

MR. McMURRY has a lofty ranking as a “Silver II” contributor to the site and as a community leader, denoted by “CL” in a red box next to his name. Community leaders also have their own forum, have direct access to Verizon technical staff members and get early glimpses of new products — all a part of cultivating super-users.

“Who knows how long I’ll keep doing this,” Mr. McMurry said, “but I’m enjoying it now.”

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: May 3, 2009
The Unboxed column last Sunday, about online volunteers who perform customer-service work for companies, misstated the amount that Benchmark Capital invested last year in Lithium Technologies, which supplies software for customer-service communities. It was $12 million, not $9 billion.

source: NY Times

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