Salesforce Unveils Breakthrough Salesforce IoT Cloud, Powered by Salesforce Thunder

Connected World, Disconnected Data: The Answer? IOT Cloud

The combination of mobile, social, sensor, wearable and cloud technologies has triggered a deluge of data. More than 90 percent of the world’s data has been generated over the last two years. And, with the number of connected devices projected to reach 75 billion by 2020, the volume of data available is expected to grow exponentially. Without making sense of all this data, we just have a ton of nothingness and a lot of talk about possibility. But it’s time for possibility to turn into probability. And that’s what is in store for companies that are looking at the IOT Cloud.

This world of connected devices and digital content presents an enormous opportunity for companies to take advantage of the new data. In a June 2015 report, the McKinsey Global Institute estimates that IoT applications may have a potential economic impact of as much as $11.1 trillion per year by 2025. However, businesses have been unable to capitalize on the vast volume of data from the Internet of Things.

Salesforce IoT Cloud, Powered by Thunder—Connecting to the Internet of Customers IoT Cloud empowers businesses to connect data from the Internet of Things, as well as any digital content, with customer information, giving context to data and making it actionable—all in real-time. Thunder, built on a massively scalable, modern architecture, can “listen” to the connected world, ingesting billions of events a day, from any source. IoT Cloud’s capabilities include:

  • Listen to the World at IoT Scale: IoT Cloud connects everything to Salesforce. In addition to the Internet of Things, connecting to phones, wearables, windmills and industrial turbines and other devices, IoT Cloud connects data from websites, social interactions and more to Salesforce. By connecting the billions of real-time events and digital content with Salesforce, the IoT Cloud brings customer context to transactional data.

  • Trigger Actions with Real-time Rules: With IoT Cloud, business users can use intuitive, point- and-click tools to define, modify and set rules and logic for events that can trigger actions across Salesforce. A global fleet management company, for example, can enforce passenger safety standards by setting filters for “hard brakes” or “hard accelerations” and defining rules that trigger in-car sensors to log service cases reporting possible instances of erratic driving. Or, a national retailer holding a holiday sale can set rules based on loyalty program status, inventory or sales performance, triggering retail beacons to send discount offers to in-store shoppers in real-time.

  • 1:1 Proactive Engagement through Salesforce: IoT Cloud seamlessly works across the Salesforce Customer Success Platform to surface insights and trigger real-time 1:1, personalized actions for sales, service, marketing or any other business process. For example, a thermostat provider can parse through billions of events gathered from weather forecasts, sensors and temperature settings to proactively alert customers on how to manage their HVAC usage within their predefined budget. Or, a vehicle assistance service partnering with an auto brand can send personalized offers on behalf of local dealers based on sensor data that tracks fluid levels and mileage.

IoT Cloud connects billions of events from devices, sensors, applications and more from the Internet of Things to Salesforce—enabling companies to unlock insights from the connected world. IoT Cloud is powered by Salesforce Thunder, a massively scalable, real-time event processing engine that enables Salesforce customers to personalize the way they sell, service, market… IoT leaders ARM, Etherios, Informatica, PTC ThingWorx and Xively LogMeln join Salesforce’s ecosystem to accelerate IoT Cloud customer success. Companies including Emerson and Pitney Bowes look to connect with their customers in powerful new ways with IoT Cloud.

Marc Benioff, chairman and chief executive officer, Salesforce said, “Salesforce is turning the Internet of Things into the Internet of Customers. The IoT Cloud will allow businesses to create real-time 1:1, proactive actions for sales, service, marketing or any other business process, delivering a new kind of customer success.”

The IOT Cloud is the beginning of making sense of all the data turn information into actionable insights that really move the needle on a businesses growth, revenue, and bottomline. It’s time technology delivered on the promise of yesterday year and that time is now. To see how it can work, check out this video.

@DrNatalie, VP and Principal Analyst, Constellation Research

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Webinar About Best Practices: Customer Experience Management, Technology, Roles and Strategy

Is your brand following any of these best practices for customer experience management? Find out more at this webinar on 6 steps to superb customer experience management and here’s the research paper on best practices in customer experience management, technology, roles and the strategy required for success! As brands realize customer experience management is key to their overall strategy and long-term growth, Constellation Research recommends considering the following to deliver an integrated web, mobile, social, email and commerce experience:

Six Approaches Brands Must Adopt to Drive Experience Management

1. Decide Who Will Lead The Experience Management Strategy: A Competitive Advantage

Leaders of experience management must be effective communicators and be able to bridge many disciplines and functional areas. They must keep their eye both on the internal needs and strategy of the business, while taking into consideration the prospect’s experience. This may mean organizations at the very least assign the CEO, CIO or CMO to this charge. Though most of these roles are in overwhelm with their current responsibilities; tough to add more and expect them to really perform well.

2. Multi-disciplinary Skill Sets Required of Chief Experience Management Officer

Regardless of who takes on the role, leaders of experience management must be effective in communicating what the goals of the experience management team are, how they fit into the rest of the business why they drive revenue. Experience management needs to be focused on what customers are interested in, have concerns about and providing the information they need to make purchases.

3. Experience Management Technology and Integration

With strategy and leadership decided, processed mapped from the customer’s viewpoint, technology can be chosen and deployed to deliver on the brand’s promise. Brands should focus on creating meaningful, multichannel interactions that optimize the customer experience, improve conversions, scale business, and increase revenue via an interconnected platform.

4. Consider an integrated, interconnected technology platform: The need to provide a continuously connected and integrated experience is often difficult if the technology wasn’t designed to provide that from the start. Contemplate a comprehensive experience platform that can provide an elegant, integrated solution that connects channels, engagement automation and analytics and commerce, with external tools and databases, to drive exceptional customer experiences for each and every unique customer.

5. Strive for unity among channel connectivity: Customers expect you to recognize them when they engage with your brand, no matter what channel or device they use. And they expect you to remember previous interactions with them and keep the context of the conversation as they move from channel to channel or device. You will want your website, as the hub of experience management, to be directly connected to the email experience you provide, as well as have it parallel simultaneously branded experiences in social, mobile, commerce and print.

6. Use predictive insights to deliver real-time, optimized responses: To provide an experience where customers can navigate across multiple devices (mobile or desk-bound), brands must deliver engagement and shopping experiences that recognize each device and automatically adjust interactions to deliver seamless experiences. You will want to be able to respond to each customer’s interactions in real time and extend relevant content and offers based on an individual’s real-time activity, when their engagement is at its highest.

Which steps are you following? All six or only a few? Use this as a guide to determine how close your organization is to best practices! Join R “Ray” Wang and I for the webinar to learn more details!

@drnatalie, VP and Principal Analyst, Constellation Research, Covering Marketing, Sales and Customer Service to Deliver Amazing Customer Experiences

 

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Social CEM: Moving Beyond Customer Loyalty to Customer Advocacy (Part Final)

Thanks for checking back in, lives dive right back in to the final part of this study!

 

3. Get Credit for Delivering Great Experiences

Social media isn’t just for fun anymore; it has evolved into a critical channel for

customer outreach and customer feedback. Social CEM allows brands to monitor,

listen and take advantage of social trends. By engaging with customers across

all channels of communication brands can now engage in customer dialogue in

an integrated fashion. Engaging in this dialogue is the first step towards a plan to

co-create your brand with your customers.

Some brands now have their own fans run their fan pages for them with minimal

oversight. This is just one of the ways that you can mobilize advocates on social

networks. Look for other opportunities to create social advocates. There are

many! And you want to look at technology providers like Empathica to help you

deploy and scale advocacy development programs.

Once you have delivered a great experience make sure you get credit for it by

making it easy for your advocates to share their stories on social media. Once

improvements are made and consumers know about those improvements, many

will often respond in kind by recommending the company to friends; driving positive

word of mouth conversations, posting positive comments online and blogging

about how the company moved heaven and earth to respond and provide great

service. This is the turning point when a consumer becomes an advocate.

It is in this moment that it is important to capture that customer’s positive emotions

and thoughts about their experience. In today’s instantaneous landscape, mailing

out surveys and hoping the customer remembers to post online their great

experience is not efficient or reliable. From the point of view of the consumer, great

customer experience memories can be fleeting. Companies who use technology

to enable the consumer in the “moments of truth” of the transaction to brag

or recommend instantly, enables their customer’s voice to be heard about their

great customer experience are leaping ahead in building and retaining consumer

advocates.

 

4. Ensure Your Whole Organization is Committed

Consider who the stakeholders are that can affect the Social CEM program. To

do this requires a dialogue within your company about the next steps for Social

CEM. Realize that different people and groups will have different points of view on

the program need and value.

Change is good and should be embraced. Often changing current operations

and processes can seem like a monumental effort. The wisdom of the old

question “how do you eat an elephant?” applies. (Answer: one bite at a time.)

Organizational changes such as a shift to Social CEM are complex processes that

take place one step at a time.

Larger organizations are often daunted by the magnitude of the implied changes

they will need to make in their operations and technology infrastructure to deliver

great customer experiences in today’s socially networked world. Empathica’s

approach to Customer Experience Transformation (Figure 11) maps out a pathway

to reach customer advocacy. This transformation process focuses on how leaders

can shift their organizational culture, put people, process and technology to work

and deliver a consistent and differentiated customer experience.

fig11

The first stage is viewing the data from which decisions can be made. While gut

instinct will always play a role in business, astute leaders will always look to data

to validate any key decisions before moving forward. Once the data is collected

and reviewed, the next stage of evolution is managing the outcomes. This is

where decisions become actions and the outcomes of the insights uncovered by

the data are put into play. As the actions begin, integrating the changes across

the entire business is the next phase of program evolution. When complete,

then a brand reaches the final stage of evolution where the customer experience

becomes a key aspect in engineering the brand, and brand identity itself.

What can set this approach apart is the focus on the endgame of brand engineering

(or re-engineering). The end goal is to have the entire company culture focused

on the customer experience. When that happens, improvements in the customer

experience can be measured as business outcomes – and brands can predict the

financial impact of improvements in customer experience scores.

A particular capability of leading Social CEM vendor solutions is the ability to

provide, (through financial linkage analysis an example of which is shown in Figure

12) the impact of higher customer satisfaction scores on return visits. In addition

it has been statistically shown that a 5% increase in customer satisfaction can

reflect the growth of sales by ~0.7%. This can translate into tens of millions of

dollars each year for large enterprises.

fig12

For organizations interested in quickly acquiring new customers as well as

supporting the current ones, long, drawn out transformation programs may not

work. Today many organizations need to take action quickly or their companies

will cease to exist. The goal of most organizations is to build customer advocacy

quickly with a short-term Social CEM strategy.

5. Social CEM Readiness Checklist

Below is a checklist to help start to evaluate where an organization is with respect

to Social CEM. How many of these questions does your organization have solid

answers and practices for?

√ Are we delivering superior, emotionally-connected Customer and Brand

Experiences across all channels and touch-points?

√ Are our Employees sufficiently engaged and performing to advance our

Experience and Brand goals?

√ Are we doing enough to leverage our “Moments of Truth” efforts?

√ Are we clearly standing out in the mind of the customer compared to our

competitors, especially with respect to customer service?

√ Do we have the technology and analytical resources in place to make dynamic

new decisions on a daily basis (i.e. things change, every day)?

√ What are we doing to move beyond customer satisfaction and loyalty to

cultivating and measuring Customer Advocacy?

 

Conclusion

Customer Experience Management is evolving into a social experience for customers

and brands alike. In an “always on,” changing and connected world, the game

to engage and interact with consumers in real-time regarding their likes, dislikes,

wants and wishes is “on” in full force. As a consumer facing company, the challenge

is to respond to social consumers, and perhaps even change how the company

operates when consumers point out their disappointments and suggestions.

In this new world, one thing is clear. Companies that continue to embrace new

consumer behaviors and develop new approaches to engaging with their brands

will be the market leaders that forge deeper connections and build active advocacy

across all brand stakeholders – owners, employees and customers.

When it comes to Social CEM, don’t feel you need to go it alone. Reach out and get

help. The Customer Experience Management industry has been around for more

than ten years and there is a treasure trove of knowledge available. Companies

such as Empathica have a wealth of information from current consumer research

and trends as well as technology that can help at http://www.empathica.com/

resources/.

Dr. Natalie: voted Top 20 In Social Media HuffPo
Dr. Natalie’s ebook: voted as one of the Top Ten Most downloaded Social Media ebooks- On smROI

Click here to watch my videos on Social Media ROI:
Video 1: Building the Business Case for Social Media
Video 2: How to Measure the ROI of Social Media
Video 3: How Social Media Benefits the Whole Company


Dr. Natalie’s Executive Success Acceleration Firm™
Executive Business Strategy Advisor & Social Customer Experience Industry Authority & Consultant

The Doctor Knows Social Media ROI & Our Business Strategies Rx Get Results!
Our Motto? Be Awesome by: Learning, Sharing & Growing!

What we do: We work with companies to deliver increased revenue and decreased costs:

  • Executive Leadership Guidance on Strategy and Business Use of Social Media
  • Social Media / Business Benchmark Assessments – Tell you what you got/ what you might consider
  • Social Media ROI – set-up measurement capabilities and dashboards
  • Workshops on Business Strategy: Customer Experience, PR, Marketing, Customer Service & Internal Employee Advocacy
  • Instructor MEMES Summer Institutes at UCLA Anderson & UCLA Extension
  • Customer Experience / Social Customer Service Excellence Benchmarking Assessments & Advisory
  • Software Company Visualized-ROI, Persona-based Solution Selling w/ Targeted USP & Messaging / ebooks, White Papers, Webinars…
  • Social Media Training, Organizational Change, Motivation and Goal Setting

My book: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans

Follow Me Here:
Twitter: @drnatalie
LinkedIn:
DrNataliePetouhoff
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Facebook:
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Social CEM: Moving Beyond Customer Loyalty to Customer Advocacy And Customer Experience (Part 4)

Welcome to Part 4 of this topic! I hope you’re finding it informative so far.

3. Deciding When (and When Not) to Take Action on Customer Feedback

Almost all businesses collect feedback from their customers. The problem is that

few incorporate that feedback into their operation or follow up with customers on

their concerns. This is often discouraging to the customers that provide feedback

in good faith that it will be used by the brand (Figure 6).

fig6

As we can see from Empathica research on the big box retailer experience in

Figure 6, survey results showed that 85% of consumers have provided some

form of feedback to big box retailers, yet only 46% of respondents believe that

brands actually use this feedback to make constructive changes to the customer

experience. In addition, only 52% believe that feedback is shared with individual

locations.

 

Consumer feedback overload can be a problem as well. In an attempt to be

more responsive to customers, brands often provide their staff with data but

stores/locations can be overwhelmed with the data they get from head office.

For instance, what should be done with negative reviews on Yelp or Google?

Should they direct my staff to focus on an issue because of one or two negative

comments received in the last month? Location managers don’t have the time

or expertise to digest and interpret the data. This causes a lack of focus and the

advent of social media can only make things worse. The answer lies in using

information from different sources at the right time.

 

Unstructured data (for example reviews from sites like Google or Yahoo) can be

very useful to observe trends at the brand level, but often contain an insufficient

volume of location specific data to be helpful to individual stores. Structured data

sources (e.g. survey responses) can be highly instructive for location specific

issues. Semi-structured data (like that from social review sites like Yelp or open ended

survey responses) can also be useful for locations as they may point to

specific issues with service or product when taken in aggregate. It is important

for brands to realize data from unstructured sources should not be given undue

weight versus feedback from semi-structured and structured sources (see Figure

7) like the customer satisfaction survey which relates to the individual location.

fig7

This is critically important to avoid location managers wrongly interpreting one or

two bad comments (that may or may not apply to their location) and changing

their approach without looking at feedback in aggregate for their location or

understanding how this impacts customer loyalty.

 

4. Consistently Delivering Customer Experiences That Positively Affect

Your Brand

 

With the advent of social media, ecommerce and global Internet shopping, your

customers are always just a click away from purchasing from a competitor. While

some customers, on occasion, will buy a company’s products or services even

though they have had a bad experience along the way, this has become the

exception not the rule with the variety of choice now available in the market. The

old mentality of “build it and they will come” worked in the past if the company

devised a way to completely lock up the marketplace. However, locking the

market is no longer possible in today’s globally connected competitive landscape.

Companies need to pay attention to the customer experience they deliver because

customers will post their experiences online and affect the opinion and shopping/

purchasing habits of other customers.

 

However, consistently delivering a great customer experience across all locations

remains a challenge for all multi-unit brands as seen in a restaurant example in

Figure 8.

fig8

As much as overall improvement is key, just as important for brands as they grow

is to develop a consistent experience. Being good every time is far better than

being great and terrible, each some of the time.

 

5. Going Beyond the Loyalty Stage to Drive Active Advocacy

 

For many years, one of the primary goals for brand marketers has been driving

customer loyalty and thus one of the 20th century customer experiences goals

was to create loyalty (i.e. generating higher customer lifetime values as customers

are consistently delighted and buy more over longer periods of time).

The 21st century goal is to add an additional step to the customer lifecycle

called customer advocacy (see Figure 4).Why? A study entitled “Inside the Buy”4

revealed that the very idea of loyalty has changed for 97% of consumers and that

a new consumer behavior, “contemporary loyalty,” is redefining loyalty.

 

It was a widely held belief that consumers who bought a brand and liked it

would potentially become brand loyalists. In the past, brand marketers felt that

the demonstration of preference for that brand over competitors or even generic

store brands meant loyalty. The wake-up call for proponents of brand loyalty is

that because consumers are exposed to so much more information, especially

with the penetration of mobile devices, they are more open to a wider range of

choices in the marketplace. The study showed that consumers do a fair amount

of research (primarily online) prior to purchasing a product, from a high of 64%

before buying electronics, to a low of 25% before purchasing food or fashion.

Of those surveyed, 94% indicated that their decision to buy was “positively

influenced” by research. Around half of consumers visit a brand’s website to

research the brand prior to purchase, and 40% said they go to third-party review

sites, but almost 75% rely on general consumer reviews as their first choice for

research intelligence.

 

At the click of a mouse, consumers can be persuaded by all the online content,

especially content written by other consumers, to become interested and even

purchase from another brand. Because of the proliferation of online reviews and

content, purchase consideration has dramatically changed. Brand marketers

must re-examine their views on brand loyalty because this online world has lead

to constant competition to get “wallet share” from the consumer. This presents

brand marketers with a new challenge to make sure they get their products in

front of real influencers (reviewers and consumers alike) and can result in costly

outreach “blogger” type programs. In fact, bloggers sometimes expect to be paid

for their endorsement of products and services.

 

Look out for Part 5 soon!

 

Dr. Natalie: voted Top 20 In Social Media HuffPo
Dr. Natalie’s ebook: voted as one of the Top Ten Most downloaded Social Media ebooks- On smROI

Click here to watch my videos on Social Media ROI:
Video 1: Building the Business Case for Social Media
Video 2: How to Measure the ROI of Social Media
Video 3: How Social Media Benefits the Whole Company


Dr. Natalie’s Executive Success Acceleration Firm™
Executive Business Strategy Advisor & Social Customer Experience Industry Authority & Consultant

The Doctor Knows Social Media ROI & Our Business Strategies Rx Get Results!
Our Motto? Be Awesome by: Learning, Sharing & Growing!

What we do: We work with companies to deliver increased revenue and decreased costs:

  • Executive Leadership Guidance on Strategy and Business Use of Social Media
  • Social Media / Business Benchmark Assessments – Tell you what you got/ what you might consider
  • Social Media ROI – set-up measurement capabilities and dashboards
  • Workshops on Business Strategy: Customer Experience, PR, Marketing, Customer Service & Internal Employee Advocacy
  • Instructor MEMES Summer Institutes at UCLA Anderson & UCLA Extension
  • Customer Experience / Social Customer Service Excellence Benchmarking Assessments & Advisory
  • Software Company Visualized-ROI, Persona-based Solution Selling w/ Targeted USP & Messaging / ebooks, White Papers, Webinars…
  • Social Media Training, Organizational Change, Motivation and Goal Setting

My book: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans

Follow Me Here:
Twitter: @drnatalie
LinkedIn:
DrNataliePetouhoff
G+ :
Google Plus posts
Facebook:
DrNatalie Petouhof

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The Social Engagement Rankings of the Top 15 Cosmetic Brands: Secret #1: Winning Brands Dynamically Engage

cosmeticHistorically brands were managed via brand guidelines that specified font, colors, icons, visual imagery, logos, and design—all of which were
incorporated in the brand’s vision, mission, positioning and benefits. The brand “toolkit”—before social media— was about creating these emblems to represent the “expression” of a brand.The emblems were the means for the brand to communicate to the “audience.” Done well, those brand emblems or assets created the experience of— and the perception of the brand.

The brand’s identity—and thus brand equity— was then expressed through:

• Promises & Guarantees
• Position & Ideology
• Logos & Icons
• Tagline & Key Messages

An emphasis in brand building is the idea of evoking an emotional connection between the brands and customers. Before social media the above brand assets were used generate the associated feelings about a brand and defined the relationship and bond with customers.

“Driven by the fundamental shift in control from companies to consumers, the future belongs to those who make emotional connections with them.”

– Kevin Roberts, CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi & Author of Lovemarks Effect

Winning in the Consumer Economy

While the old brand assets obviously still matter, a brand’s ability to compete in the digital and social world requires something additional.

When a brand participates with their customers, those interactions shape customer’s perception of the brand. Transitioning from static logos to interactions requires a brand to create new brand guidelines to incorporate social media. Those guidelines need to detail how the brand organizes it’s communications into interactions and drives engagement with customers.

Engagement means that a brand must become an active participant with it’s customers. Digital brands are not just “things” customers
buy. Today’s customers are seeking an experience, where the audience is the main attraction, not the brand. The brand is no longer the “story”
– the interaction is. The currency?

The authors of the Cluetrain Manifesto said, “Markets are conversations.”

The social web is essentially a storytelling medium. To effectively engage customers, a brand needs to develop a brand persona and the
ability to uniquely tell its story. Part of telling that story is also creating compelling content.

How Branding Building & Marketing Changed With Social Media

“With more and more consumers committed to spending their money before they set foot inside a store, the challenge is: How can you get them to commit to spending on your product or service? The answer is you’ve got to make an emotional connection with your consumers.”

-Marshal Cohen, Chief Industry Analyst, NPD

Today, brand perception is shaped by the conversation between the brand and the customer, where the customers’ motivation is to make an emotional connection with the brand. It’s imperative to understand the difference between “awareness” and being “loved” by customers. To be a “Loved“ brand requires the brand correspond with customers in a genuine, authentic and real persona. Out with stale, stiff, rigid one- way brand communications. In with social, deeply personal , novel two-way dialogues.

Thus, Digital Cosmetic Brands are activities and social experiences requiring a brand to define their behavior strategy. Some of those interaction behaviors include being:

• Transparent, of service, entertaining

• Providing utility, rewards & unique, exclusive experiences.

What might get in the way of delivering social experiences?

Stayed tuned for Secret #2! And if you want to download the whole ebook on the Top 15 Most Engaged Cosmetic Brands:  click here

Executive Success Acceleration Firm
We work with brands & software companies to deliver increased revenue and decreased costs.
Our Motto? Learn. Share. Grow!

@DrNatalie L. Petouhoff

Want to see how to get an ROI from Social Media? Check out these fun videos:
Video 1: Building the Business Case for Social Media
Video 2: How to Measure the ROI of Social Media
Video 3: How Social Media Benefits the Whole Company

Here’s My book on How Businesses can Drive Sales on Facebook: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans

Want to get more info on the business use of social media? Connect with me here:
Twitter:
 @drnatalie
LinkedIn: DrNataliePetouhoff
G+ : Google Plus posts
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/natalie.petouhoff

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A Facebook Commerce Pop-Up Store- Social Commerce For Small Business: Rachel Roy Jewelry

How to use a Facebook Commerce Pop-up Store / Social Commerce For Small Business and Monetize Fans

Social commerce is the addition of shopping to social networks. Small business can profit from Facebook Commerce. But if businesses aren’t careful, social commerce has the potential to ruin social networks. That’s why it’s important how brands fulfill on f-commerce. It will directly affect the success not only for their own individual brand, but as an industry as a whole. If social networking shopping sites are not delivered in the spirit of what the customer wants, it will fail. If they are delivered well, social commerce can succeed. If not for this point alone, brands need to pay attention to f-commerce as an example of how shopping can be integrated within a social network.

English: American fashion designer Rachel Roy.

Image via Wikipedia

An example of someone who really gets social commerce? That would be Rachel Roy. Rachel used a pop-up store— a Facebook commerce store to create engaging social merchandising experiences that increase a brand’s fan base while driving transactions. By creating immersive brand experiences that fully integrate shopping as well as the shopper’s wider social network, the brand increased their social currency with those fans and customers. And a pop-up shop is a great way for brand to test the f-commerce waters without going into full-scale  shop.

Rachel Roy launched a pop-up store on Facebook, giving fan’s a shopping event that included early access to Roy’s new jewelry line which was a collaboration with British R&B artist, Estelle. Rachel Roy provided a limited edition, time sensitive offering that helped drive sales without having to offer a discount.

The pop-up store lasted three days and boosted Rachel Roy’s fan base by 25% in the first day and 100% by the end of the campaign. The Facebook Page acquired 1 fan every 1.5 seconds. The exclusive, limited edition piece sold out in six hours.

Rachel Roy

Image by Rubenstein via Flickr

 

 

 

The Rachel Roy pop-up shop was built on a software-as-a-service solution created by Fluid Social Fan Shop of the Fluid Agency. This is an e-commerce firm whose clients include Diane von Furstenberg, Nine West, Theory, Vans and Coach.

6 hours: Time it took for the Rachel Roy Facebook jewelry store to sell out.

3rd highest: daily sales made by Rachel Roy, the day it opened its pop-up f-store.

Bravo to Rachel Roy for being a social commerce diva!!

 

You can find more examples like this in Dr. Natalie’s Book: Like My Stuff: How To Monetize Your Facebook Fans With a Facebook Store and learn how to use social commerce for your business!

@drnatalie Learn. Share. Grow!™

Dr. Natalie Petouhoff is a social media business and ROI business adviser. You can find her here:

Twitter: @drnatalie
LinkedIn: DrNataliePetouhoff
website/blog: www.drnatalienews.com/blog

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