Tech Startup RevJet Reveals World’s First Creative Side Platform (CSP)

One way to enter the marketplace is to do all your development stealth-style and then announce to the world what you have created. And that, in fact is what RevJet, a tech start-up has done. Atter a year of confidential development, the marketing technology corporation revealed the first-of-its-kind Creative Side Platform (CSP), which extends it’s marketing technology to incorporate the ad creatives that undergird the world’s annual $500 billion media spend directly under the real-time control of marketing departments and their creative agencies.

So What Does This Mean to You? With the CSP, marketers and their creative agencies can now effortlessly construct, view, serve, measure, and automatically optimize all their ad creatives for all their media buys across all formats — including mobile, social, video and programmatic ad campaigns — all from a single platform.

What Type of Results Are Companies that use RevJet Experiencing?

In its first few weeks operating on the RevJet CSP, Microsoft rapidly achieved 100+% performance improvements across diverse digital ad campaigns via dozens of rounds of effortless, automatically optimizing ad creative experiments.

For years, I’ve preached to my team that we must always be experimenting with ad creatives, but we’ve never had anything like the RevJet CSP to make it happen,” said Grad Conn, CMO lead for Microsoft’s Centralized Marketing Organization. “Their CSP is the first truly comprehensive ad creative platform built to facilitate effortless creative experimentation at its very core. We’re quickly adapting to life on the CSP and are thrilled to onboard four of our creative agencies and two DSPs.

What’s Different about RevJet? The RevJet CSP is the first and only comprehensive platform designed to enable continuous, automated, high-velocity ad creative experimentation and drive perpetual performance improvement for ad creatives of any format. The underlying CSP technology is already battle-tested in the marketplace, having propelled LifeStreet Media to a $100+ million exit and a market leadership position amongst Facebook app developers.

RevJet empowers marketers to automatically optimize the creative send to specific audiences in real time across channels and media. As ad tech and marketing tech converge, a platform like RevJet could be used with the whole content marketing process. For Marketers who choose this, it could give them differentiating capability  compared to the competition. In addition, brands that building marketing cloud solutions should consider RevJet a potential differentiator.

Who is Backing RevJet? Nautic Partners, the Providence-based private equity firm, announced its $66  million LifeStreet investment in 2012, and in October 2014 announced a technology spinoff along with plans to launch RevJet as a standalone marketing technology startup. RevJet is backed by $2.5 billion private equity firm Nautic Partners.

And a Word From the Founder and CEO “Our CSP is purpose-built to extend marketing technology’s reach, finally unlocking the $500 billion dollars’ worth of pent-up value trapped within the world’s ad creatives,” said Mitchell Weisman, RevJet founder and CEO. “Tapping into this massive value is only possible by scalably increasing the performance of ad creatives across all devices and formats.  Having already used the core CSP technology to build and sell a leading media company for over $100 million, we’re confident the CSP can drive the world’s media spend to go 2x to 3x further.

Want to Learn More? RevJet CEO Mitchell Weisman and Microsoft’s Diana Choksey will be speaking about the future of creative and tech at the iMedia Breakthrough Summit in Austin this coming Tuesday, October 27th. Learn more here.

My POV: What’s really interesting is the convergence of technology, as well as silo functional departments in brands. Perhaps software will be the driving force to get departments that don’t always collaborate to do so. Another example of how corporate politics should be a white collar crime – i.e., not collaborating. But the digital disruption is driving more than changes to technology; it’s affecting people, process and technology.

@DrNatatalie VP and Principal Analyst, Constellation Research

Share